Getting WACC’d in Latin America: How renewable energy policies affect cost of capital

Summary: Every Latin American government designs policies and establishes market mechanisms that address different risks, looking to minimize them and therefore the weighted average cost of capital (WACC) of renewable energy investment projects. This article outlines various policy risks and gives examples of individual country successes and failures.

Carlos St James closeupAbout the AuthorCarlos St. James is an advisor to energy investors and developers in emerging markets. He founded the Argentine Renewable Energies Chamber in 2005; has been a board member of the Latin American & Caribbean Council on Renewable Energy since 2010; founded the Middle East-Americas Energy Council in 2014; and publishes the Latin American Energy Review in his free time.

He was recently named Summit Chairman of the upcoming LAC-CORE Finance Summit in Miami, Florida in September 2016. Continue reading “Getting WACC’d in Latin America: How renewable energy policies affect cost of capital”

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Why Latin America prefers investing in wind energy over solar

Summary: Bucking the global trend, Latin America favors investing in wind – and by a wide margin. A brief analysis on why this might be, focusing on perceptions of risk as well as struggles to embrace new social contracts.

Carlos St James closeupAbout the Author: Carlos St. James is an advisor to energy investors and developers in emerging markets. He founded the Argentine Renewable Energies Chamber in 2005; has been a board member of the Latin American & Caribbean Council on Renewable Energy since 2010; founded the Middle East-Americas Energy Council in 2014; and is publisher of the Latin American Energy Review.

He was recently named Chairman of the upcoming LAC-CORE Finance Summit in Miami, Florida in September 2016.

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Five things Argentina can do to boost renewables

Summary: A new government, a decade’s worth of pent-up demand, uncommonly abundant wind and sun and water.  Five things the country must do to begin to regain credibility and attract the $5 billion it needs over the next two years.

Carlos St James closeupAbout the Author: Carlos St. James is an advisor to energy investors and developers in emerging markets. He founded the Argentine Renewable Energies Chamber; is a board member of the Latin American & Caribbean Council on Renewable Energy; founded and is chairman of the Middle East-Americas Energy Council; and is publisher of the Latin American Energy Review.

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Brazil’s renewable energy industry at a crossroads

An overview of the state and outlook of Brazil’s renewable energy industry, detailing the country’s potential, renewable energy installed capacity and pricing trends, and discussion be sector including wind, bioenergy (primarily ethanol) and solar.

Camila Ramos
Camila Ramos

Invited Contributor: Camila Ramos authored this piece exclusively for The Review. She is Director at Clean Energy Latin America/CELA, and a board member of the Washington-based Latin American & Caribbean Council on Renewable Energy/LAC-CORE.

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The Aura Solar Initiative Triggers New Energy Frontier in Mexico

With its world-class solar resource and location, Mexico is a major candidate for solar energy development: with an average solar radiation around 5.8 kWh/m2 per day, it receives twice as much solar resource as Germany, for example. Despite this privileged resource, the ground-mounted photovoltaic capacity in the country is only about 6 megawatts. This implies a huge untapped potential, amidst the increasing cost of energy in the country and the exceptional regulatory framework for renewable energy.

Hector Olea
Hector Olea

Invited Contributor: Hector Olea authored this piece exclusively for The Review. He is CEO of Gauss Energia, a firm specialized in Mexico’s energy sector. From 1995 to 2000 Hector was Chairman of the Mexican Energy Regulatory Commission (CRE).

Continue reading “The Aura Solar Initiative Triggers New Energy Frontier in Mexico”

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