Latin America’s renewable energy investment shifts towards Sonoran sun and Patagonian wind

Summary: With Brazil’s economic and political woes continuing, investors are migrating to both ends of Latin America – towards Mexico in the north and to the southern cone countries of Chile and Argentina – for their next round of investments in solar and wind. Each of these markets represent different risks and rewards.

About the publisherCarlos St. James is a leading advisor to energy investors, bankers and developers in emerging markets at Wood Group. He is also a board member of the Latin American & Caribbean Council on Renewable Energy (LAC-CORE) and publishes the Latin American Energy Review to help generate debate on the industry’s issues.

The region’s single most important event is the upcoming LAC-CORE Clean Energy Finance Summit, held in Miami, Florida this coming June 13-15, where investors and bankers discuss the industry’s outlook. See you there!

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Why the Latin American renewable energy sector needs to convene

Summary: The Latin American renewable energy sector has developed well in part because of solid institutions and increasing access to transparent information. The next step in its evolution is an annual event where the regional  industry can meet to celebrate its successes, to honor its leaders, and to debate the issues.  That event will take place in Miami this October.

Carlos St JamesAbout the AuthorCarlos St. James is an advisor to energy investors and developers in emerging markets. He co-founded the Argentine Renewable Energies Chamber in 2005; has been a board member of the Latin American & Caribbean Council on Renewable Energy since 2010; founded the Middle East-Americas Energy Council in 2014; and publishes the Latin American Energy Review in his free time. LAC-CORE Finance Summit

 He was recently named Summit Chairman of the upcoming LAC-CORE Finance Summit held at the Ritz Carlton in Miami, Florida this October 3-5.

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Cuba’s new renewable energy market in need of capital

Summary: Cuba is being courted by numerous governments seeking to gain influence for the country’s significant energy investment needs. But given the lack of traditional development bank funding, there is an opportunity for creative capital sources and for Latin American countries to come to Cuba’s aid and take a leadership role in the renewable energy sector — especially sugarcane bagasse biomass and ethanol.

Carlos St JamesAbout the AuthorCarlos St. James is an advisor to energy investors and developers in emerging markets. He co-founded the Argentine Renewable Energies Chamber in 2005; has been a board member of the Latin American & Caribbean Council on Renewable Energy since 2010; founded the Middle East-Americas Energy Council in 2014; and publishes the Latin American Energy Review in his free time. 

LAC-CORE Finance Summit

He was recently named Summit Chairman of the upcoming LAC-CORE Finance Summit to be held at the Ritz Carlton in Miami, Florida this October 3-5 and which will include a keynote from Delice Moreno Garcia, Director General of INEL, Cuba’s engineering company and part of its Ministry of Energy and Mines. INEL is responsible for assessing all technical aspects of the influx of renewable energy investment onto the island.

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Latin America’s revolución energética needs more revolutionaries

Summary: Significant declines in renewable energy PPA pricing in the region makes clear we are dealing with a commodity with understandable and quantifiable technology risks – a business model that has not really changed since inception a century ago. Yet the true energy revolution that will transform the way citizens power their lives has yet to capture the imagination of our region. This brief analysis makes the case that once it does, it is likely to be stronger in Latin America than anywhere else.

About the AuthorCarlos St. James is an advisor to energy investors and developers in emerging markets. He co-founded the Argentine Renewable Energies Chamber in 2005; has been a board member of the Latin American & Caribbean Council on Renewable Energy since 2010; founded the Middle East-Americas Energy Council in 2014; and publishes the Latin American Energy Review in his free time. 

LAC-CORE Finance SummitHe was recently named Summit Chairman of the upcoming LAC-CORE Finance Summit held at the Ritz Carlton in Miami, Florida this October, which will include discussions on the opportunities in smart grids.

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Getting WACC’d in Latin America: How renewable energy policies affect cost of capital

Summary: Every Latin American government designs policies and establishes market mechanisms that address different risks, looking to minimize them and therefore the weighted average cost of capital (WACC) of renewable energy investment projects. This article outlines various policy risks and gives examples of individual country successes and failures.

Carlos St James closeupAbout the AuthorCarlos St. James is an advisor to energy investors and developers in emerging markets. He founded the Argentine Renewable Energies Chamber in 2005; has been a board member of the Latin American & Caribbean Council on Renewable Energy since 2010; founded the Middle East-Americas Energy Council in 2014; and publishes the Latin American Energy Review in his free time.

He was recently named Summit Chairman of the upcoming LAC-CORE Finance Summit in Miami, Florida in September 2016. Continue reading “Getting WACC’d in Latin America: How renewable energy policies affect cost of capital”

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Dismantling Energy Subsidies in Latin America

Summary: The drop in oil prices creates a unique opportunity for some Latin American and Caribbean nations to reduce their costly energy subsidies. The region’s most populist governments – including Venezuela, Argentina, Ecuador and Bolivia — have by far the highest and therefore represent the best opportunities for change. The why and how this needs to take place, using Argentina as the first agent of change.

Carlos St James closeupAbout the AuthorCarlos St. James is an advisor to energy investors and developers in emerging markets. He founded the Argentine Renewable Energies Chamber in 2005; has been a board member of the Latin American & Caribbean Council on Renewable Energy since 2010; founded the Middle East-Americas Energy Council in 2014; and is publisher of the Latin American Energy Review.

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Natural Gas Policy in Puerto Rico

A brief summary of Puerto Rico’s energy sourcing past, coupled with an outline of how recent island administrations have come to the conclusion that liquid natural gas (LNG) – provided primarily from the United States – is likely to provide the most cost-effective solutions providing for continued economic growth for the Commonwealth.

Fernando Pena
Fernando Peña

Invited Contributors: Fernando Peña and Colleen Newman co-authored this piece exclusively for The Review. Fernando serves as an attorney for the Office of International Trade, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, and its predecessor agency in the U.S. Treasury. Colleen served as the energy advisor to Puerto Rico Governor Luis Fortuño in his Washington office.

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